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Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2012 Mar;220(2):351-65. doi: 10.1007/s00213-011-2481-3. Epub 2011 Oct 18.

Memory improvements in elderly women following 16 weeks treatment with a combined multivitamin, mineral and herbal supplement: A randomized controlled trial.

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1
Centre for Human Psychopharmacology, NICM Collaborative Centre for Neurocognition, Swinburne University of Technology, 427-451 Burwood Road, Hawthorn, Melbourne, VIC, 3122, Australia. hmacpherson@swin.edu.au

Abstract

RATIONALE:

There is potential for multivitamin supplementation to improve cognition in the elderly. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted to investigate the effects of 16 weeks multivitamin supplementation (Swisse Women's 50+ Ultivite ®) on cognition in elderly women.

METHODS:

Participants in this study were 56 community dwelling, elderly women, with subjective complaints of memory loss. Cognition was assessed using a computerized battery of memory and attention tasks designed to be sensitive to age-related declines to fluid intelligence, and a measure of verbal recall. Biochemical measures of selected nutrients, homocysteine, markers of inflammation, oxidative stress, and blood safety parameters were also collected. All cognitive and haematological parameters were assessed at baseline and 16 weeks post-treatment.

RESULTS:

The multivitamin improved speed of response on a measure of spatial working memory, however benefits to other cognitive processes were not observed. Multivitamin supplementation decreased levels of homocysteine and increased levels of vitamin B(6) and B(12), with a trend for vitamin E to increase. There were no hepatotoxic effects of the multivitamin formula indicating this supplement was safe for everyday usage in the elderly.

CONCLUSION:

Sixteen weeks ssupplementation with a combined multivitamin, mineral and herbal formula may benefit working memory in elderly women at risk of cognitive decline.

PMID:
22006207
DOI:
10.1007/s00213-011-2481-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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