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Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011 Dec;19(6):467-73. doi: 10.1097/MOO.0b013e32834cd54a.

Management of pediatric orbital cellulitis and abscess.

Author information

1
Children's National Medical Center, George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia 20010, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

Orbital cellulitis and abscess formation in pediatric patients usually arises as a complication of acute sinusitis and if untreated may cause visual loss or life-threatening intracranial complications. This review describes the current evaluation and management of this condition.

RECENT FINDINGS:

Computed tomography with contrast remains the optimal imaging study for orbital inflammation. Orbital inflammation is still classified by Chandler's original description as preseptal or postseptal and nearly all cases of preseptal cellulitis are managed with oral antibiotics. Most cases of postseptal cellulitis are managed with intravenous antibiotics, although surgical therapy is required for some abscesses, particularly large ones. Patients under 9 years respond to medical management more frequently than older patients but recent studies confirm that even children over 9 with small or moderate-sized abscesses and normal vision deserve a medical trial before surgical intervention. Medial subperiosteal abscesses that fail medical therapy are usually drained endoscopically, whereas lateral or intraconal abscesses require an open procedure.

SUMMARY:

Periorbital complications of sinusitis in pediatric patients often respond to medical therapy but may require surgical intervention to prevent serious complications. Continuous in-house evaluation of patients is necessary to observe for progression of symptoms and to optimize outcome.

PMID:
22001661
DOI:
10.1097/MOO.0b013e32834cd54a
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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