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Diabetes Care. 2011 Dec;34(12):2551-4. doi: 10.2337/dc11-0652. Epub 2011 Oct 12.

Low water intake and risk for new-onset hyperglycemia.

Author information

1
Université Paris–Diderot, Paris 7, Paris, France. ronan.roussel@bch.aphp.fr

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Water intake alters vasopressin secretion. Recent findings reveal an independent association between plasma copeptin, a surrogate for vasopressin, and risk of diabetes.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

Participants were 3,615 middle-aged men and women, with normal baseline fasting glycemia (FG), who were recruited in a 9-year follow-up study. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs for the incidence of hyperglycemia (FG ≥6.1 mmol/L or treatment for diabetes) were calculated according to daily water intake classes based on a self-administered questionnaire.

RESULTS:

During follow-up, there were 565 incident cases of hyperglycemia. After adjustment for confounding factors, ORs (95% CIs) for hyperglycemia associated with classes of water intake (<0.5 L, n = 677; 0.5 to <1.0 L, n = 1,754; and >1.0 L, n = 1,184) were 1.00, 0.68 (0.52-0.89), and 0.79 (0.59-1.05), respectively (P = 0.016).

CONCLUSIONS:

Self-reported water intake was inversely and independently associated with the risk of developing hyperglycemia.

PMID:
21994426
PMCID:
PMC3220834
DOI:
10.2337/dc11-0652
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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