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Head Neck. 2011 Nov;33(11):1581-5. doi: 10.1002/hed.21631. Epub 2010 Dec 6.

Oral maxillary squamous carcinoma: an indication for neck dissection in the clinically negative neck.

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1
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Sanford-MeritCare Health System, Fargo, North Dakota, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This multicenter study was undertaken to characterize the metastatic behavior of oral maxillary squamous carcinoma and to determine the role of selective neck dissection.

METHODS:

A retrospective, multicenter study of patients surgically treated for oral maxillary squamous carcinoma was completed. Data collected included primary tumor location, cervical lymph node status, and neck failure rate.

RESULTS:

The study included 146 patients. The adjusted regional metastatic rate was 31.4%. Of those N0 (clinically negative) necks treated with or without neck dissection, 14.4% developed cervical metastasis. Within the cohort, 7.5% of patients died with distant disease. The regional salvage rate was 52.9%. None of the patients with locoregional failures were salvaged.

CONCLUSIONS:

Maxillary palatal, alveolar, and gingival squamous carcinomas exhibit aggressive regional metastatic behavior. Surgical salvage rates for neck failure are low; therefore, selective neck dissection (levels I-III) is recommended at the time of resection of T2, T3, and T4 maxillary squamous carcinomas.

PMID:
21990223
DOI:
10.1002/hed.21631
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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