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Cell Metab. 2011 Oct 5;14(4):528-36. doi: 10.1016/j.cmet.2011.08.014.

Nicotinamide mononucleotide, a key NAD(+) intermediate, treats the pathophysiology of diet- and age-induced diabetes in mice.

Author information

1
Department of Developmental Biology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA.

Abstract

Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has become epidemic in our modern lifestyle, likely due to calorie-rich diets overwhelming our adaptive metabolic pathways. One such pathway is mediated by nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), the rate-limiting enzyme in mammalian NAD(+) biosynthesis, and the NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase SIRT1. Here, we show that NAMPT-mediated NAD(+) biosynthesis is severely compromised in metabolic organs by high-fat diet (HFD). Strikingly, nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), a product of the NAMPT reaction and a key NAD(+) intermediate, ameliorates glucose intolerance by restoring NAD(+) levels in HFD-induced T2D mice. NMN also enhances hepatic insulin sensitivity and restores gene expression related to oxidative stress, inflammatory response, and circadian rhythm, partly through SIRT1 activation. Furthermore, NAD(+) and NAMPT levels show significant decreases in multiple organs during aging, and NMN improves glucose intolerance and lipid profiles in age-induced T2D mice. These findings provide critical insights into a potential nutriceutical intervention against diet- and age-induced T2D.

PMID:
21982712
PMCID:
PMC3204926
DOI:
10.1016/j.cmet.2011.08.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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