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J Am Coll Cardiol. 2011 Oct 11;58(16):1664-71. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2011.05.057.

Benefit of early statin therapy in patients with acute myocardial infarction who have extremely low low-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

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1
Heart Research Center, Chonnam National UniversityHospital, 671 Jaebongro, Dong-gu, Gwangju, South Korea.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We investigated whether statin therapy could be beneficial in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) who have baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels below 70 mg/dl.

BACKGROUND:

Intensive lipid-lowering therapy with a target LDL-C value <70 mg/dl is recommended in patients with very high cardiovascular risk. However, whether to use statin therapy in patients with baseline LDL-C levels below 70 mg/dl is controversial.

METHODS:

We analyzed 1,054 patients with AMI who had baseline LDL-C levels below 70 mg/dl and survived at discharge from the Korean Acute MI Registry between November 2005 and December 2007. They were divided into 2 groups according to the prescribing of statins at discharge (statin group n = 607; nonstatin group n = 447). The primary endpoint was the composite of 1-year major adverse cardiac events, including death, recurrent MI, target vessel revascularization, and coronary artery bypass grafting.

RESULTS:

Statin therapy significantly reduced the risk of the composite primary endpoint (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.34 to 0.89; p = 0.015). Statin therapy reduced the risk of cardiac death (HR: 0.47; 95% CI: 0.23 to 0.93; p = 0.031) and coronary revascularization (HR: 0.45, 95% CI: 0.24 to 0.85; p = 0.013). However, there were no differences in the risk of the composite of all-cause death, recurrent MI, and repeated percutaneous coronary intervention rate.

CONCLUSIONS:

Statin therapy in patients with AMI with LDL-C levels below 70 mg/dl was associated with improved clinical outcome.

Comment in

PMID:
21982310
DOI:
10.1016/j.jacc.2011.05.057
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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