Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Mol Cell. 2011 Oct 7;44(1):29-38. doi: 10.1016/j.molcel.2011.07.035.

Regulation of chromatin organization and inducible gene expression by a Drosophila insulator.

Author information

1
Department of Biology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA.

Abstract

Insulators are multiprotein-DNA complexes thought to affect gene expression by mediating inter- and intrachromosomal interactions. Drosophila insulators contain specific DNA-binding proteins plus common components, such as CP190, that facilitate these interactions. Here, we examine changes in the distribution of Drosophila insulator proteins during the heat-shock and ecdysone responses. We find that CP190 recruitment to insulator sites is the main regulatable step in controlling insulator function during heat shock. In contrast, both CP190 and DNA-binding protein recruitment are regulated during the ecdysone response. CP190 is necessary to stabilize specific chromatin loops and for proper activation of transcription of genes regulated by this hormone. These findings suggest that cells may regulate recruitment of insulator proteins to DNA to activate insulator activity at specific sites and create distinct patterns of nuclear organization that are necessary to achieve proper gene expression in response to different stimuli.

PMID:
21981916
PMCID:
PMC3190163
DOI:
10.1016/j.molcel.2011.07.035
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center