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Br J Cancer. 2011 Oct 25;105(9):1379-87. doi: 10.1038/bjc.2011.404. Epub 2011 Oct 6.

Low ANXA10 expression is associated with disease aggressiveness in bladder cancer.

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1
Department of Molecular Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Aarhus N, Denmark.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Markers for outcome prediction in bladder cancer are urgently needed. We have previously identified a molecular signature for predicting progression in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. ANXA10 was one of the markers included in the signature and we now validated the prognostic relevance of ANXA10 at the protein level.

METHODS:

We investigated ANXA10 expression by immunohistochemistry using a tissue microarray with 249 Ta and T1 urothelial carcinomas. The expression of ANXA10 was also investigated in an additional set of 97 more advanced tumours. The functional role of ANXA10 in cell lines was investigated by siRNA-mediated ANXA10 knockdown using wound-healing assays, proliferation assays, and ingenuity pathway analysis.

RESULTS:

Low expression of ANXA10 correlated with shorter progression-free survival in patients with stage Ta and T1 tumours (P<0.00001). Furthermore, patients with more advanced tumours and low ANXA10 expression had an unfavourable prognosis (P<0.00001). We found that ANXA10 siRNA transfected cells grew significantly faster compared with control siRNA transfected cells. Furthermore, a wound-healing assay showed that ANXA10 siRNA transfected cells spread along wound edges faster than control transfected cells.

CONCLUSION:

We conclude that ANXA10 may be a clinical relevant marker for predicting outcome in both early and advanced stages of bladder cancer.

PMID:
21979422
PMCID:
PMC3241563
DOI:
10.1038/bjc.2011.404
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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