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Cancer Causes Control. 2011 Dec;22(12):1659-68. doi: 10.1007/s10552-011-9842-4. Epub 2011 Oct 5.

The influence of physicians on colorectal cancer screening behavior.

Author information

1
Division of Medical Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Clinic, 600 W. 10th Ave, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Our aims were to determine clinical factors associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) screening and to evaluate the relative role of patient contact with physicians and the quality of these patient-physician interactions in affecting screening.

METHODS:

Screening-eligible patients were identified from the Health Information National Trends Survey. Determinants of CRC screening were assessed with logistic regression, and a joint effects model that considered the frequency and quality of contact with physicians was developed to explore their influence on screening.

RESULTS:

There were 4,615 respondents of whom only 66% reported receiving CRC screening. Older age, personal history of non-CRC, family history of any cancer, high-income earners, individuals who visited their physicians ≥5 times per year, and those who rated the interactions with their physicians highly were more likely to be screened (all p < 0.05). The joint effects model revealed that quality rather than frequency of physician contact was a stronger predictor of CRC screening, but the odds of screening was highest for those who experienced both frequent and high-quality interactions with their physicians.

CONCLUSIONS:

Contact with physicians and the quality of this interaction are associated with screening behavior. Interventions to improve these provider-related factors may promote CRC screening.

PMID:
21971815
DOI:
10.1007/s10552-011-9842-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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