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J Hand Surg Eur Vol. 2012 Oct;37(8):722-7. doi: 10.1177/1753193411422680. Epub 2011 Sep 30.

Nonoperative treatment of PIPJ flexion contractures associated with Dupuytren's disease.

Author information

1
Hotel Dieu Hospital, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

Post-surgical outcomes in patients with Dupuytren's disease causing flexion contractures of the proximal interphalangeal joint can be inconsistent and are often associated with protracted rehabilitation, reduced flexion, recurrence of the contracture, and patient dissatisfaction. An alternative treatment option, comprised of splinting and soft tissue mobilization techniques, was introduced to stabilize early contractures of the proximal interphalangeal joint in the hopes of delaying or obviating surgery. Over the course of approximately 12.6 months (± 7.8), thirteen patients were followed at the hand clinic at Hotel Dieu Hospital in Kingston. One patient was unable to complete the course of therapy. Of the remaining patients, analysis showed significant improvement in active proximal interphalangeal joint extension of approximately 14.6° (SD: ± 5.1°; range: 5-25°) over the course of the treatment (p < .05). Nighttime static extension splinting and soft tissue mobilization techniques appear to delay and possibly prevent the need for surgery in individuals with flexion contractures of the proximal interphalangeal joint due to Dupuytren's disease.

PMID:
21965179
DOI:
10.1177/1753193411422680
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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