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Eur Psychiatry. 2013 Jan;28(1):49-52. doi: 10.1016/j.eurpsy.2011.07.005. Epub 2011 Oct 2.

Oral disease in relation to future risk of dementia and cognitive decline: prospective cohort study based on the Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease: Preterax and Diamicron Modified-Release Controlled Evaluation (ADVANCE) trial.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College of London, Torrington Place, London, UK. david.batty@ucl.ac.uk

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Examine the association of oral disease with future dementia/cognitive decline in a cohort of people with type 2 diabetes.

METHODS:

A total of 11,140 men and women aged 55-88 years at study induction with type 2 diabetes participated in a baseline medical examination when they reported the number of natural teeth and days of bleeding gums. Dementia and cognitive decline were ascertained periodically during a 5-year follow-up.

RESULTS:

Relative to the group with the greatest number of teeth (more than or equal to 22), having no teeth was associated with the highest risk of both dementia (hazard ratio; 95% confidence interval: 1.48; 1.24, 1.78) and cognitive decline (1.39; 1.21, 1.59). Number of days of bleeding gums was unrelated to these outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS:

Tooth loss was associated with an increased risk of both dementia and cognitive decline.

PMID:
21964484
PMCID:
PMC4170753
DOI:
10.1016/j.eurpsy.2011.07.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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