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J Clin Virol. 2011 Dec;52(4):353-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jcv.2011.08.025. Epub 2011 Oct 2.

Global study of viral diarrhea in hospitalized children in Spain: results of structural surveillance of viral gastroenteritis net work (VIGESS-net) 2006-2008.

Author information

1
Viral Gastroenteritis Unit, Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Ctra. Majadahonda Km 2, 28220 Madrid, Spain. asanchez@isciii.es

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

Detection and characterization of gastroenteritis cases (viruses) was conducted during eleven years through the surveillance VIGESS-net, which was created in an effort to conduct a structured surveillance of rotavirus genotypes co-circulating in Spain.

STUDY DESIGN AND RESULTS:

This phase includes the study of 2048 fecal samples from children <5 years old, hospitalized in fifteen different hospitals throughout Spain from March 2006 to March 2008. Of them, 821 (40.1%) samples were rotavirus positive. Rotavirus was identified as the only etiological agent in 694 (33.9%) cases and in 127 (6.2%) was found as coinfection with other enteric viruses, mainly with noroviruses. Predominant G genotypes detected were G1 (49.8%) followed by G9 (32.9%), G3 (2.6%), G8 (1.0%), G4 (0.4%), G6 (0.2%) and G12 (0.2%). The G2 was encountered in 3.2% of cases. Rotavirus mixed G-types infections occurred in 3.9% of cases. The main G/P combinations were G1P[8] (51.9%) and G9P[8] (35.6%), which predominates alternatively in the first and second period of the study. More rare combinations occur in less than 7.4% of cases.

CONCLUSION:

The diversity of rotavirus circulating strains suggests to maintain a surveillance system through different regions of the country.

PMID:
21963269
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcv.2011.08.025
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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