Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2012 Mar;21(3):269-75. doi: 10.1002/pds.2245. Epub 2011 Sep 29.

Assessing vaccine safety communication with healthcare providers in a large urban county.

Author information

1
Northwest Center for Public Health Practice, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98105, USA. dmeranus@uw.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Vaccination is the primary public health tool for influenza control. Rapid assessment of the safety of any widely disseminated pandemic influenza vaccine is a public health priority. This study identifies practices, strengths, and weaknesses of vaccine-associated adverse event (AE) reporting to inform public health systems improvement.

METHODS:

A survey was developed with local and state health agencies' input. After pre-testing, the survey was distributed online and via mail to a random sample of King County, WA, healthcare professionals, composed of 60 commercial vaccinator employees and school health nurses, 500 physicians, and 300 pharmacists.

RESULTS:

The response rate was 36%. Results indicate that if an AE was suspected, 17% of respondents would not know how to report it, with 61% of respondents citing unclear definitions of a reportable AE as a barrier and 18% of respondents unaware of whose responsibility it is to report an AE.

CONCLUSION:

Healthcare professionals who provide immunizations need additional information on their role in vaccine safety and AE reporting. Strengthening both passive and active reporting systems can enhance surveillance efforts during real-time events, such as mass immunization during a pandemic and other large-scale emergency countermeasure distribution programs.

PMID:
21956894
DOI:
10.1002/pds.2245
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Wiley
    Loading ...
    Support Center