Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Bone Miner Res. 2012 Jan;27(1):170-6. doi: 10.1002/jbmr.524.

Effects of three-monthly oral 150,000 IU cholecalciferol supplementation on falls, mobility, and muscle strength in older postmenopausal women: a randomized controlled trial.

Author information

1
School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.

Abstract

Daily vitamin D in addition to calcium supplementation reduces falls and fractures in older women. However, poor adherence to therapy is a common clinical problem. To examine the effects of supervised oral 3-monthly vitamin D therapy on falls, muscle strength, and mobility, we conducted a 9-month randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 686 community-dwelling ambulant women aged over 70 years. Participants received either oral cholecalciferol 150,000 IU every 3 months (n = 353) or an identical placebo (n = 333). All participants were advised to increase dietary calcium intake. Falls data were collected 3-monthly. At baseline, 3, 6, and 9 months, muscle strength was measured by a handheld dynamometer and mobility by the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test. Serum 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) was measured in a subgroup of 40 subjects. Mean age at baseline was 76.7 ± 4.1 years. The average serum 25OHD value at baseline was 65.8 ± 22.7 nmol/L. By 3, 6, and 9 months after supplementation, 25OHD levels of the vitamin D group were approximately 15 nmol/L higher than the placebo group. Calcium intake did not change significantly between baseline (864 ± 412 mg/day) and 9 months (855 ± 357 mg/day). Faller rates in the two groups did not differ: vitamin D group, 102 of 353 (29%); placebo group, 89 of 333 (27%). At 9 months, compared to placebo or baseline, muscle strength, and TUG were not altered by vitamin D. In conclusion, oral cholecalciferol 150,000 IU therapy administered 3-monthly had neither beneficial nor adverse effects on falls or physical function. These data together with previous findings confirm that intermittent large doses of vitamin D are ineffective or have a deleterious effect on falls. Thus despite adherence issues with daily vitamin D replacement, an intermittent, high-dose vitamin D regimen cannot be supported as a strategy to reduce falls and fractures.

PMID:
21956713
DOI:
10.1002/jbmr.524
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Wiley
    Loading ...
    Support Center