Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Vet Immunol Immunopathol. 2011 Dec 15;144(3-4):270-89. doi: 10.1016/j.vetimm.2011.08.022. Epub 2011 Sep 10.

Host-response patterns of intramammary infections in dairy cows.

Author information

1
Quality Milk Production Services, Cornell University, 240 Farrier Road, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA. yschukken@cornell.edu

Abstract

Many different bacterial species have the ability to cause an infection of the bovine mammary gland and the host response to these infections is what we recognize as mastitis. In this review we evaluate the pathogen specific response to the three main bacterial species causing bovine mastitis: Escherichia coli, Streptococcus uberis and Staphylococcus aureus. In this paper we will review the bacterial growth patterns, host immune response and clinical response that results from the intramammary infections. Clear differences in bacterial growth pattern are shown between bacterial species. The dominant pattern in E. coli infections is a short duration high bacteria count infection, in S. aureus this is more commonly a persistent infection with relative low bacteria counts and in S. uberis a long duration high bacteria count infection is often observed. The host immune response differs significantly depending on the invading bacterial species. The underlying reasons for the differences and the resulting host response are described. Finally we discuss the clinical response pattern for each of the three bacterial species. The largest contrast is between E. coli and S. aureus where a larger proportion of E. coli infections cause potentially severe clinical symptoms, whereas the majority of S. aureus infections go clinically unnoticed. The relevance of fully understanding the bovine host response to intramammary infection is discussed, some major gaps in our knowledge are highlighted and directions for future research are indicated.

PMID:
21955443
DOI:
10.1016/j.vetimm.2011.08.022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center