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Expert Rev Neurother. 2011 Oct;11(10):1443-65. doi: 10.1586/ern.11.137.

An update on the pharmacotherapy of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in adults.

Author information

1
Clinical Research Program in Pediatric Psychopharmacology, Child Psychiatry Service, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. twilens@partners.org

Abstract

Adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are more frequently presenting for diagnosis and treatment. Medication is considered to be appropriate among available treatments for ADHD; however, the evidence supporting the use of pharmacotherapeutics for adults with ADHD remains less established. In this article, the effectiveness and dosing parameters of the various agents investigated for adult ADHD are reviewed. In adults with ADHD, short-term improvements in symptomatology have been documented through the use of stimulants and antidepressants. Studies suggest that methylphenidate and amphetamine maintained an immediate onset of action, whereas the ADHD response to the nonstimulants appeared to be delayed. At a group level, there appears to be some, albeit not entirely consistent, dose-dependent responses to amphetamine and methylphenidate. Generally speaking, variability in diagnostic criteria, dosing parameters and response rates between the various studies was considerable, and most studies were of a relatively short duration. The aggregate literature shows that the stimulants and catecholaminergic nonstimulants investigated had a clinically significant beneficial effect on treating ADHD in adults.

PMID:
21955201
PMCID:
PMC3229037
DOI:
10.1586/ern.11.137
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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