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Neurobiol Learn Mem. 2012 Jan;97(1):37-46. doi: 10.1016/j.nlm.2011.09.001. Epub 2011 Sep 18.

Activation and role of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in extinction of ethanol-induced associative learning in mice.

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1
Department of Behavioral Neuroscience, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239, USA. groblews@ohsu.edu

Abstract

Although the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) has been shown to be integrally involved in extinction of a number of associative behaviors, its role in extinction of alcohol (ethanol)-induced associative learning has received little attention. Previous reports have provided evidence supporting a role for the mPFC in acquisition and extinction of amphetamine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) in rats, however, it remains unknown if this region is necessary for extinction of ethanol (EtOH)-induced associative learning in mice. Using immunohistochemical analysis of phosphorylated and unphosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), the current set of experiments first showed that the prelimbic (PL) and infralimbic (IL) subregions of the mPFC exhibited dynamic responses in phosphorylation of CREB to a Pavlovian-conditioned, EtOH-paired cue. Interestingly, CREB phosphorylation within these regions was sensitive to manipulations of the EtOH-cue contingency-that is, the cue-induced increase of pCREB in both the PL and IL was absent following extinction. In order to confirm a functional role of the mPFC in regulating the extinction process, we then showed that electrolytic lesions of the mPFC following acquisition blocked subsequent extinction of EtOH-CPP. Together, these experiments indicate a role for the PL and IL subregions of the mPFC in processing changes of the EtOH-cue contingency, as well as in regulating extinction of EtOH-induced associative learning in mice.

PMID:
21951632
PMCID:
PMC3246036
DOI:
10.1016/j.nlm.2011.09.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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