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PLoS One. 2011;6(9):e25017. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0025017. Epub 2011 Sep 20.

Post-streptococcal antibodies are associated with metabolic syndrome in a population-based cohort.

Author information

1
Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States of America.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Streptococcal infections are known to trigger autoimmune disorders, affecting millions worldwide. Recently, we found an association between post-streptococcal autoantibodies against Protein Disulphide Isomerase (PDI), an enzyme involved in insulin degradation and insulin resistance. This led us to evaluate associations between post-streptococcal antibodies and metabolic syndrome, as defined by the updated National Cholesterol Education Program definition, 2005.

METHODS AND FINDINGS:

Metabolic data (HDL, triglycerides, fasting glucose, blood pressure, waist circumference, BMI, smoking), post-streptococcal antibodies (anti-Streptolysin O (ASO) and anti-PDI), and C-reactive protein (CRP, as a general inflammatory marker), were assessed in 1156 participants of the Wisconsin Sleep Cohort Study. Anti-PDI antibodies were found in 308 participants (26.6%), ASO≥100 in 258 (22.3%), and 482 (41.7%) met diagnostic criteria for metabolic syndrome. Anti-PDI antibodies but not ASO were significantly associated with metabolic syndrome [n = 1156, OR 1.463 (95% CI 1.114, 1.920), p = 0.0062; adjusted for age, gender, education, smoking]. Importantly, the anti-PDI-metabolic syndrome association remained significant after adjusting for CRP and fasting insulin.

CONCLUSIONS:

Post-streptococcal anti-PDI antibodies are associated with metabolic syndrome regardless of fasting insulin and CRP levels. Whereas these data are in line with a growing body of evidence linking infections, immunity and metabolism, additional studies are necessary to establish the post-streptococcal-metabolic syndrome association.

PMID:
21949836
PMCID:
PMC3176794
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0025017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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