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Alcohol Alcohol. 2012 Jan-Feb;47(1):25-32. doi: 10.1093/alcalc/agr140. Epub 2011 Sep 22.

Brief alcohol intervention by newly trained workers versus leaflets: comparison of effect in older heavy drinkers identified in a population health examination survey: a randomized controlled trial.

Author information

1
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark. ago@niph.dk

Abstract

AIMS:

To test if a brief motivational intervention (BMI) in a non-treatment seeking population of heavy drinkers results in a reduced alcohol intake.

METHODS:

Screening of 12,364 participants in a Danish health examination survey led to 1026 heavy drinkers of whom 772 were included and randomized to a BMI group (n = 391) or a control group (n = 381) receiving two leaflets about alcohol. Follow-up took place after 6 and 12 months including 670 and 616 participants respectively. The outcome measure was self-reported weekly alcohol consumption. Data were analysed according to the intention-to-treat principle. We used the Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity 3.0 code (MITI) as a quality control of the interventions delivered.

RESULTS:

The intervention effect of the BMI was -1.0 drinks/week, but the effect was not significant. The MITI analysis showed that the quality of the BMI delivered was sub-optimal, as only one of four aspects was above the recommended level for beginning proficiency.

CONCLUSION:

We found no effect of a BMI in reducing alcohol consumption. The generalizability of the study is questionable, as individuals with the lowest level of education, low income and unmarried individuals are under-represented.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00728767.

PMID:
21949192
DOI:
10.1093/alcalc/agr140
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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