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J Aging Health. 2011 Oct;23(7):1027-49. doi: 10.1177/0898264311421524.

Life-course exposure to early socioeconomic environment, education in relation to late-life cognitive function among older Mexicans and Mexican Americans.

Author information

1
University of California San Francisco, School of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, 3333 California Street, Suite 280, San Francisco, CA 94118, USA. adina.zekialhazzouri@ucsf.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To examine the associations between life-course education and late-life cognitive function along with the modifying role of migration history.

METHOD:

The combined sample includes 1,789 participants from the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging and 5,253 participants from the Mexican Health and Aging Study. Aged 60+ at baseline, participants were classified as Mexican residents, Mexicans-return migrants, Mexicans-immigrants to the United States, and Mexicans-U.S. born. Cognitive function was measured using standardized z scores of a short-term verbal recall test. Multivariate linear regression analysis was conducted.

RESULTS:

Participants' z scores were higher among those whose mother had more than elementary education (β = 0.28, p < .05). Participant's education mediated this association. For 5-year difference in education, the cognitive z score increased by 0.3 points for a U.S. born. Results were similar with father's education.

DISCUSSION:

Adult educational attainment mediates the effect of childhood socioeconomic status on late-life cognition. Migration plays a role in shaping cognitive aging.

PMID:
21948769
PMCID:
PMC3412879
DOI:
10.1177/0898264311421524
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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