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Dig Dis Sci. 2012 Feb;57(2):440-50. doi: 10.1007/s10620-011-1906-5. Epub 2011 Sep 23.

Safety, tolerability, and activity of ALV003: results from two phase 1 single, escalating-dose clinical trials.

Author information

1
Alvine Pharmaceuticals, 75 Shoreway Road, Suite B, San Carlos, CA 94070, USA. msiegel@alvinepharma.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Celiac disease is the most common hereditary autoimmune disease in humans. The only treatment option for non-refractory celiac disease patients is adherence to a strict life-long gluten-free diet, which often fails to normalize small bowel histology. ALV003 is a mixture of two proteases that degrades gluten and is in clinical development as an oral therapy for patients with celiac disease.

AIMS:

The safety, tolerability, and activity of ALV003 were assessed in two phase 1 clinical trials.

METHODS:

In study 1 (N = 28) the study drug was administered in the fasted state; in study 2 (N = 53) the study drug was administered together with a gluten-containing meal. Both studies were single-dose, single-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over trials. ALV003 was dosed at escalating dose levels by cohort (100, 300, 900, and 1,800 mg) and gastric samples were aspirated using a nasogastric tube. Adverse events, serum drug levels, and anti-drug antibody titers were measured. Gastric samples were assessed for ALV003 enzymatic activity over time (gastric pharmacokinetics) and gluten degradation (gastric pharmacodynamics).

RESULTS:

All doses were well tolerated, and no serious adverse events or allergic reactions were observed. Gastric aspirates collected 30 min following a meal showed that 100 and 300 mg ALV003 degraded 75 ± 10% (N = 8) and 88 ± 5% (N = 8), respectively, of one gram of wheat bread gluten.

CONCLUSIONS:

ALV003 is an orally active protease that appears to be stable in the fed stomach and degrades dietary gluten in this compartment. Single doses of oral ALV003 were not associated with serious adverse reactions.

PMID:
21948339
DOI:
10.1007/s10620-011-1906-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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