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Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol. 2012 Feb 1;4(2). pii: a005132. doi: 10.1101/cshperspect.a005132.

Extracellular matrix proteins in hemostasis and thrombosis.

Author information

1
Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7035, USA.

Abstract

The adhesion and aggregation of platelets during hemostasis and thrombosis represents one of the best-understood examples of cell-matrix adhesion. Platelets are exposed to a wide variety of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins once blood vessels are damaged and basement membranes and interstitial ECM are exposed. Platelet adhesion to these ECM proteins involves ECM receptors familiar in other contexts, such as integrins. The major platelet-specific integrin, αIIbβ3, is the best-understood ECM receptor and exhibits the most tightly regulated switch between inactive and active states. Once activated, αIIbβ3 binds many different ECM proteins, including fibrinogen, its major ligand. In addition to αIIbβ3, there are other integrins expressed at lower levels on platelets and responsible for adhesion to additional ECM proteins. There are also some important nonintegrin ECM receptors, GPIb-V-IX and GPVI, which are specific to platelets. These receptors play major roles in platelet adhesion and in the activation of the integrins and of other platelet responses, such as cytoskeletal organization and exocytosis of additional ECM ligands and autoactivators of the platelets.

PMID:
21937733
PMCID:
PMC3281566
DOI:
10.1101/cshperspect.a005132
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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