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BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2011 Sep 21;12:205. doi: 10.1186/1471-2474-12-205.

Implementation of neck/shoulder exercises for pain relief among industrial workers: a randomized controlled trial.

Author information

1
Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, 5320 Odense M, Denmark. mettezebis@hotmail.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Although leisure-time physical activity is important for health, adherence to regular exercise is challenging for many adults. The workplace may provide an optimal setting to reach a large proportion of the adult population needing regular physical exercise. This study evaluates the effect of implementing strength training at the workplace on non-specific neck and shoulder pain among industrial workers.

METHODS:

Cluster-randomized controlled trial involving 537 adults from occupations with high prevalence of neck and shoulder pain (industrial production units). Participants were randomized to 20 weeks of high-intensity strength training for the neck and shoulders three times a week (n = 282) or a control group receiving advice to stay physically active (n = 255). The strength training program followed principles of progressive overload and periodization. The primary outcome was changes in self-reported neck and shoulder pain intensity (scale 0-9).

RESULTS:

85% of the participants followed the strength training program on a weekly basis. In the training group compared with the control group, neck pain intensity decreased significantly (-0.6, 95% CI -1.0 to -0.1) and shoulder pain intensity tended to decrease (-0.2, 95% CI -0.5 to 0.1, P = 0.07). For pain-cases at baseline (pain intensity > = 3) the odds ratio - in the training group compared with the control group--for being a non-case at follow-up (pain intensity < 3) was 2.0 (95% CI 1.0 to 4.2) for the neck and 3.9 (95% CI 1.7 to 9.4) for the shoulders.

CONCLUSION:

High-intensity strength training relying on principles of progressive overload can be successfully implemented at industrial workplaces, and results in significant reductions of neck and shoulder pain.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

NCT01071980.

PMID:
21936939
PMCID:
PMC3188479
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2474-12-205
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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