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Diabetes. 2011 Nov;60(11):2775-86. doi: 10.2337/db11-0227. Epub 2011 Sep 20.

Responses of gut microbiota and glucose and lipid metabolism to prebiotics in genetic obese and diet-induced leptin-resistant mice.

Author information

1
Metabolism and Nutrition Research Group, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Université Catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium.

Erratum in

  • Diabetes. 2011 Dec;60(12):3307. Muccioli, Giulio M [corrected to Muccioli, Giulio G].

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate deep and comprehensive analysis of gut microbial communities and biological parameters after prebiotic administration in obese and diabetic mice.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

Genetic (ob/ob) or diet-induced obese and diabetic mice were chronically fed with prebiotic-enriched diet or with a control diet. Extensive gut microbiota analyses, including quantitative PCR, pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA, and phylogenetic microarrays, were performed in ob/ob mice. The impact of gut microbiota modulation on leptin sensitivity was investigated in diet-induced leptin-resistant mice. Metabolic parameters, gene expression, glucose homeostasis, and enteroendocrine-related L-cell function were documented in both models.

RESULTS:

In ob/ob mice, prebiotic feeding decreased Firmicutes and increased Bacteroidetes phyla, but also changed 102 distinct taxa, 16 of which displayed a >10-fold change in abundance. In addition, prebiotics improved glucose tolerance, increased L-cell number and associated parameters (intestinal proglucagon mRNA expression and plasma glucagon-like peptide-1 levels), and reduced fat-mass development, oxidative stress, and low-grade inflammation. In high fat-fed mice, prebiotic treatment improved leptin sensitivity as well as metabolic parameters.

CONCLUSIONS:

We conclude that specific gut microbiota modulation improves glucose homeostasis, leptin sensitivity, and target enteroendocrine cell activity in obese and diabetic mice. By profiling the gut microbiota, we identified a catalog of putative bacterial targets that may affect host metabolism in obesity and diabetes.

PMID:
21933985
PMCID:
PMC3198091
DOI:
10.2337/db11-0227
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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