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Diabetes Metab. 2012 Feb;38(1):34-9. doi: 10.1016/j.diabet.2011.07.003. Epub 2011 Sep 16.

The association between leptin and insulin levels in adults with cystic fibrosis.

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1
Université de Montréal, Faculty of Medicine, Nutrition Department, 2375, chemin de la Côte-Sainte-Catherine, Montréal, Québec, Canada.

Abstract

Cystic fibrosis (CF)-related diabetes is an important complication of CF caused by a decrease in insulin secretion that is associated with weight loss, poor nutritional status and increased mortality. Leptin, a hormone secreted from white adipose tissue, has an important role in energy homoeostasis by inhibiting food intake and increasing energy expenditure. Leptin secretion can be increased by nutrient signals such as insulin.

AIMS:

Considering that leptin plays a role in energy homoeostasis and that CF is associated to poor weight gain and decreased insulin secretion, leptin levels in CF patients with different glucose tolerances were investigated and compared with those of healthy control subjects.

METHODS:

Two-hour oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) were performed in 82 patients with CF and various glucose tolerances as well as in 17 healthy control subjects during which blood was withdrawn every 30 min to measure glucose and insulin. Fasting leptin, fibrinogen and fat mass were also measured, and body mass index (kg/m(2)) calculated for all participants. Early and late insulin secretion was separated by calculating the area under the curve from time 0 to 30 min and 30 to 120 min of the OGTT (AUC(0-30) and AUC(30-120)).

RESULTS:

Leptin levels were comparable between CF patients and healthy control subjects. Interestingly, correlations were observed between leptin levels and insulin (AUC(0-120) and AUC(30-120)) after adjusting for gender and fat mass (P<0.05).

CONCLUSION:

This study suggests a potential role of insulin in regulating leptin levels in adults with stable CF.

PMID:
21925915
DOI:
10.1016/j.diabet.2011.07.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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