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Proc Biol Sci. 2012 Mar 22;279(1731):1161-7. doi: 10.1098/rspb.2011.1373. Epub 2011 Sep 14.

Social laughter is correlated with an elevated pain threshold.

Author information

1
British Academy Centenary Research Project, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. robin.dunbar@anthro.ox.ac.uk

Abstract

Although laughter forms an important part of human non-verbal communication, it has received rather less attention than it deserves in both the experimental and the observational literatures. Relaxed social (Duchenne) laughter is associated with feelings of wellbeing and heightened affect, a proximate explanation for which might be the release of endorphins. We tested this hypothesis in a series of six experimental studies in both the laboratory (watching videos) and naturalistic contexts (watching stage performances), using change in pain threshold as an assay for endorphin release. The results show that pain thresholds are significantly higher after laughter than in the control condition. This pain-tolerance effect is due to laughter itself and not simply due to a change in positive affect. We suggest that laughter, through an endorphin-mediated opiate effect, may play a crucial role in social bonding.

PMID:
21920973
PMCID:
PMC3267132
DOI:
10.1098/rspb.2011.1373
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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