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Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol. 2011 Sep 15;7:14. doi: 10.1186/1710-1492-7-14.

Supported by science?: what canadian naturopaths advertise to the public.

Author information

1
Health Law and Science Policy Group, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. tcaulfld@law.ualberta.ca.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The increasing popularity of complementary and alternative medicines in Canada has led to regulatory reforms in Ontario and British Columbia. Yet the evidence for efficacy of these therapies is still a source of debate. Those who are supportive of naturopathic medicine often support the field by claiming that the naturopathic treatments are supported by science and scientific research.

METHODS:

To compare provinces that are regulated and unregulated, we examined the websites of 53 naturopathic clinics in Alberta and British Columbia to gain a sense of the degree to which the services advertised by naturopaths are science based.

RESULTS:

There were very few differences between the provinces in terms of the types of services offered and conditions treated. Many of the most common treatments--such as homeopathy, chelation and colon cleanses--are viewed by the scientific community to be of questionable value and have no scientific evidence of efficacy beyond placebo.

CONCLUSIONS:

A review of the therapies advertised on the websites of clinics offering naturopathic treatments does not support the proposition that naturopathic medicine is a science and evidence-based practice.

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