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PLoS One. 2011;6(9):e24301. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0024301. Epub 2011 Sep 2.

Adaptive evolution of Staphylococcus aureus during chronic endobronchial infection of a cystic fibrosis patient.

Author information

1
The Roslin Institute and Centre for Infectious Diseases, Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, University of Edinburgh, Easter Bush, Midlothian, United Kingdom.

Abstract

The molecular adaptation of Staphylococcus aureus to its host during chronic infection is not well understood. Comparative genome sequencing of 3 S. aureus isolates obtained sequentially over 26 months from the airways of a cystic fibrosis patient, revealed variation in phage content, and genetic polymorphisms in genes which influence antibiotic resistance, and global regulation of virulence. The majority of polymorphisms were isolate-specific suggesting the existence of an heterogeneous infecting population that evolved from a single infecting strain of S. aureus. The genetic variation identified correlated with differences in growth rate, hemolytic activity, and antibiotic sensitivity, implying a profound effect on the ecology of S. aureus. In particular, a high frequency of mutations in loci associated with the alternate transcription factor SigB, were observed. The identification of genes under diversifying selection during long-term infection may inform the design of novel therapeutics for the control of refractory chronic infections.

PMID:
21912685
PMCID:
PMC3166311
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0024301
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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