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Ann Hepatol. 2011 Oct-Dec;10(4):486-92.

Decrease of aminotransferase levels in obese women is related to body weight reduction, irrespective of type of diet.

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1
Biomedical Research Unit, Mexican Social Security Institute and the Research Group on Diabetes and Chronic Illnesses, Durango, Mexico.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the efficacy of low carbohydrate diet (LCD) as compared with low fat diet (LFD) to decrease aminotransferase levels in obese women with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

A total of 59 women were randomly enrolled in a non-controlled clinical intervention study to receive either LCD or LFD during six months. Apparently healthy non-pregnant obese women aged 20 to 65 years were eligible to participate. Previous diagnosis of hepatic disease, serum creatinine level ≥ 1.5 mg/dL, severe life-limiting medical illness, pregnancy, active participation in other dietary program, use of weight loss drugs, or alcohol consumption ≥ 30 g per day were exclusion criteria.

RESULTS:

A total of 31 obese women who received LCD were compared with 28 women allocated in the LFD group. There were 3 (LCD group) and 2 (LFD group) women with lost of follow-up. No differences in the proportion of type 2 diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia were noted between women in the LCD and LFD groups. At end of follow-up, there were not significant statistical differences in the anthropometric and biochemical characteristics between women in both groups. The weight loss was 5.7 and 5.5% for women in the LCD LFD groups. Although the decrease of AST (31.7 and 22.4%) and ALT (41 and 33.3%) levels was more elevated in the women of LCD group, as compared with the LFD group, there were not significant statistical differences.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results show that weight loss, irrespective of the type of diet, reduces aminotransferase levels in obese women with NAFLD.

PMID:
21911890
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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