Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2011 Oct 17;52(11):8186-92. doi: 10.1167/iovs.11-8267.

Physical activity and ocular perfusion pressure: the EPIC-Norfolk eye study.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom. jlyy2@medschl.cam.ac.uk

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To examine the relationship between physical activity and ocular perfusion pressure (OPP), a consistent risk factor for glaucoma.

METHODS:

The relationship between previous physical activity and current OPP in 5650 participants aged 48 to 90 who attended the first (1993-1997) and third (2006-2010) health check as part of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer (EPIC)-Norfolk study was examined. Usual combined physical activity at work and leisure was assessed using a validated instrument. Individuals were categorized as inactive, moderately inactive, moderately active, or active. Three IOP measurements were obtained (Ocular Response Analyzer [ORA]; Reichert, Inc., Depew, NY). Mean Goldmann correlated IOP (IOPg) from one eye was used in the analysis. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) were recorded as the mean of two measurements taken with a sphygmomanometer. Associations between physical activity and low (≤40 mm Hg) mean OPP (2/3 mean arterial pressure - IOP) and low (≤50 mm Hg) diastolic OPP (diastolic BP - IOP) were tested using logistic regression, adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, social class, IOP, and BP.

RESULTS:

Active people had a lower risk of mean OPP ≤ 40 mm Hg and diastolic OPP ≤ 50 mm Hg after adjusting for age, sex, social class, and body mass index (odds ratio, 0.75; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.60-0.93; P < 0.01) and (odds ratio, 0.73, 95% CI, 0.58-0.93; P = 0.01), respectively. The association between physical activity and perfusion pressure was independent of IOP, but largely mediated through diastolic BP.

CONCLUSIONS:

Lower levels of physical activity were associated with lower OPP. Further research is needed to investigate the potential benefit of increased physical activity as a safe and simple method of modifying glaucoma risk.

PMID:
21911585
DOI:
10.1167/iovs.11-8267
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
Loading ...
Support Center