Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2012 Aug;18(8):763-8. doi: 10.1111/j.1469-0691.2011.03632.x. Epub 2011 Sep 12.

Sustained high prevalence of pneumococcal serotype 1 in paediatric parapneumonic empyema in southern Spain from 2005 to 2009.

Author information

1
Department of Paediatric Infectious Diseases and Immunology, Hospital Infantil Universitario Virgen del Rocío, Sevilla, Spain. IOSANTAELLA@telefonica.net

Abstract

The epidemiology and microbiological characteristics of paediatric parapneumonic empyema (PPE) before the introduction of the new generation of conjugate pneumococcal vaccines (10-valent and 13-valent) are described. All patients <14 years old admitted to a tertiary paediatric hospital with a diagnosis of PPE were prospectively enrolled from January 2005 to December 2009. Pneumococcal serotyping of culture-negative pleural fluid samples was performed using a multiplex real-time PCR assay. Overall, 219 patients had PPE. Incidence rates for PPE remained stable during the study period with a not significant increase in 2009 compared with 2005 (p 0.13), and were temporally associated with higher circulation of pandemic influenza A H1N1 during the last quarter in our population (p 0.001). Pneumococci were detected in 72% of culture-positive and 79% of culture-negative samples. Serotypes were determined in 104 PPE cases. Serotype 1 was the most prevalent serotype identified (42%) followed by serotypes 7F (20%), 3 (16%), 19A (8%) and 5 (7%). Serotype distribution remained similar during all time periods. Pneumococcal serotype 1 remained the most common cause of PPE during the 5-year study. The new generation of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines offers potential serotype coverage of 73% (10-valent) and 99% (13-valent) in the population studied suffering from PPE. Continuous epidemiological and molecular studies are paramount to monitor the impact of pneumococcal vaccines on the epidemiology of PPE.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center