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Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2011 Aug;8(8):3246-62. doi: 10.3390/ijerph8083246. Epub 2011 Aug 5.

Descriptive study on parents' knowledge, attitudes and practices on antibiotic use and misuse in children with upper respiratory tract infections in Cyprus.

Author information

1
Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Thessaly, 22 Papakyriazi street, Larissa 41222, Greece. rousounides@cytanet.com.cy

Abstract

Upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) are common in children and represent a significant cause of antibiotic abuse which contributes to the development of antibiotic resistance. A survey was conducted in Cyprus in 2006 to assess parents' and pediatricians' Knowledge, Attitude and Practices (KAP) concerning the role of antibiotics in children with URTIs. A school-based stratified geographic clustering sampling was used and a pre-tested KAP questionnaire was distributed. A different questionnaire was distributed to paediatricians. Demographic factors associated with antibiotic misuse were identified by backward logistic regression analysis. The parental overall response rate was 69.3%. Parents (N = 1,462) follow pediatricians advice and rarely administer antibiotics acquired over the counter. Although a third expects an antibiotic prescription for URTI symptoms, most deny pressuring their doctors. Low parental education was the most important independent risk factor positively related to antibiotic misuse (OR = 2.88, 95%CI 2.02 to 4.12, p < 0.001). Pediatricians (N = 33) denied prescribing antibiotics after parental pressure but admit that parents ask for antibiotics and believe they expect antibiotic prescriptions even when not needed. In conclusion, Cypriotic parents trust their primary care providers. Although it appears that antibiotic misuse is not driven by parental pressure, the pediatricians' view differs.

KEYWORDS:

KAP study; antibiotic misuse; antibiotic overuse; antibiotics; attitudes; bacterial resistance; knowledge; parents; practices; questionnaire

PMID:
21909304
PMCID:
PMC3166740
DOI:
10.3390/ijerph8083246
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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