Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Cyst Fibros. 2012 Jan;11(1):49-52. doi: 10.1016/j.jcf.2011.08.005. Epub 2011 Sep 9.

Australian epidemic strain pseudomonas (AES-1) declines further in a cohort segregated cystic fibrosis clinic.

Author information

1
Department of Respiratory Medicine, Royal Children's Hospital, Victoria 3052, Australia. mandie.griffiths@rch.org.au

Abstract

AIM:

To evaluate changes in prevalence of an epidemic strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (AES-1, Australian epidemic strain, type 1) in a paediatric cystic fibrosis (CF) centre practising cohort segregation, to describe the patients' clinical characteristics at acquisition and observe mortality rates.

METHODS:

Cohort segregation was introduced in our paediatric CF clinic January 2000. The prevalence of AES-1 was analysed in 1999, 2002 and 2007. Age at acquisition, lung function, presence of bronchiectasis, hospitalisations, prior P. aeruginosa infection and mortality rates were collected. AES-1 infection was determined by pulse-field-gel-electrophoresis (PFGE) on airway specimen cultures taken three monthly.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of AES-1 declined from 21% in 1999 to 14% in 2002 (risk difference 7% (95% CI 1,13) p=0.0256) and to 6% in 2007 (risk difference 8% (95% CI 3,13) p=0.0018). New acquisitions after the introduction of cohort segregation were uncommon (10 by 2002 and another 7 by 2007) with a declining incidence of 3.3 cases/year (1999 to 2002) compared to 1.4 cases/year (2002 to 2007). Twenty-two of 32 (69%) deaths between 1999 and 2007 occurred in patients infected with AES-1.

CONCLUSION:

Cohort segregation has been associated with reductions in the prevalence of AES-1 in our CF clinic. Mortality was higher in patients infected with AES-1 than other organisms.

PMID:
21907639
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcf.2011.08.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center