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Acta Radiol. 2011 Dec 1;52(10):1101-6. doi: 10.1258/ar.2011.100295. Epub 2011 Sep 8.

Comparison of image quality and radiation dose between combined automatic tube current modulation and fixed tube current technique in CT of abdomen and pelvis.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Tube current is an important determinant of radiation dose and image quality in X-ray-based examination. The combined automatic tube current modulation technique (ATCM) enables automatic adjustment of the tube current in various planes (x-y and z) based on the size and attenuation of the body area scanned.

PURPOSE:

To compare image quality and radiation dose of the ATCM with those of a fixed tube current technique (FTC) in CT of the abdomen and pelvis performed with a 16-slice multidetector row CT.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

We reviewed 100 patients in whom initial and follow-up CT of the abdomen and pelvis were performed with FTC and ATCM. All acquisition parameters were identical in both techniques except for tube current. We recorded objective image noise in liver parenchyma, subjective image noise and diagnostic acceptability by using a five-point scale, radiation dose, and body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2)). Data were analyzed with parametric and non-parametric statistical tests.

RESULTS:

There was no significant difference in image noise and diagnostic acceptability between two techniques. All subjects had acceptable subjective image noise in both techniques. The significant reduction in radiation dose (45.25% reduction) was noted with combined ATCM (P < 0.001). There was a significant linear statistical correlation between BMI and dose reduction (r = -0.78, P < 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

The ATCM for CT of the abdomen and pelvis substantially reduced radiation dose while maintaining diagnostic image quality. Patients with lower BMI showed more reduction in radiation dose.

PMID:
21903869
DOI:
10.1258/ar.2011.100295
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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