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IEEE Trans Biomed Eng. 2011 Nov;58(11):3250-9. doi: 10.1109/TBME.2011.2166963. Epub 2011 Sep 1.

Effect of insertion speed on tissue response and insertion mechanics of a chronically implanted silicon-based neural probe.

Author information

1
Department of Neurosciences, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. welkenh@imec.be

Abstract

In this study, the effect of insertion speed on long-term tissue response and insertion mechanics was investigated. A dummy silicon parylene-coated probe was used in this context and implanted in the rat brain at 10 μm/s (n = 6) or 100 μm/s (n = 6) to a depth of 9 mm. The insertion mechanics were assessed by the dimpling distance, and the force at the point of penetration, at the end of the insertion phase, and after a 3-min rest period in the brain. After 6 weeks, the tissue response was evaluated by estimating the amount of gliosis, inflammation, and neuronal cell loss with immunohistochemistry. No difference in dimpling, penetration force, or the force after a 3-min rest period in the brain was observed. However, the force at the end of the insertion phase was significantly higher when inserting the probes at 100 μm/s compared to 10 μm/s. Furthermore, an expected tissue response was seen with an increase of glial and microglial reactivity around the probe. This reaction was similar along the entire length of the probe. However, evidence for a neuronal kill zone was observed only in the most superficial part of the implant. In this region, the lesion size was also greatest. Comparison of the tissue response between insertion speeds showed no differences.

PMID:
21896383
DOI:
10.1109/TBME.2011.2166963
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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