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Br J Nutr. 2012 Mar;107(6):928-33. doi: 10.1017/S0007114511003746. Epub 2011 Sep 7.

The role of glutathione S-transferase M1 and T1 gene polymorphisms and fruit and vegetable consumption in antioxidant parameters in healthy subjects.

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1
Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health and Family Medicine, Capital Medical University, No. 10, Xitoutiao, You An Men, Beijing 100069, People's Republic of China.

Abstract

The correlation of glutathione S-transferase (GST) M1/T1 genetic polymorphisms with oxidative stress-related chronic diseases was proved recently. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association of GSTM1/T1 genetic polymorphisms with antioxidant biomarkers and consumption of fruits and vegetables (F&V) in healthy subjects. In this study, for conducting a 3 d dietary survey, 190 healthy adults were recruited. After DNA extraction, a multiple PCR method was used for GSTM1/T1 genotyping. A spectrophotometer method was applied for the determination of plasma total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), vitamin C level and erythrocyte GST enzyme activity. A general linear model was used to compare the mean values of antioxidant parameters for different GSTM1/T1 genotypes and consumption of F&V. Polymorphisms of GSTM1/T1 had no effects on plasma T-AOC and vitamin C levels. Deletion of the GSTM1 gene decreased the erythrocyte GST activity. There was correlation between plasma T-AOC and consumption of F&V in the GSTM1⁻ or GSTT1⁺ subjects. A similar pattern was evident for erythrocyte GST activity in the GSTM1⁻ subjects. No association was found among consumption of F&V and GSTM1/T1 genotypes and plasma vitamin C level. Different consumption of F&V had no impact on plasma T-AOC and vitamin C levels in the GSTM1⁻/GSTT1⁺ or GSTM1⁻/GSTT1⁻ subjects. The erythrocyte GST activity was more sensitive to consumption of F&V in the individuals with the GSTM1⁻/GSTT1⁺ genotype. Association was found among GSTM1/T1 genotypes, antioxidant parameters and consumption of F&V. Large-scale and multiple ethnic studies are needed to further evaluate the relationship.

PMID:
21896242
DOI:
10.1017/S0007114511003746
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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