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Prostate Cancer Prostatic Dis. 2011 Dec;14(4):361-6. doi: 10.1038/pcan.2011.42. Epub 2011 Sep 6.

Preoperative weight change and risk of adverse outcome following radical prostatectomy: results from the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital database.

Author information

1
Duke Prostate Center, Division of Urologic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC 27710, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We examined the relationship between weight change in the year before radical prostatectomy (RP) and biochemical recurrence (BCR) and adverse pathology.

METHODS:

We abstracted data from 359 men undergoing RP in the SEARCH (Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital) database between 2001-2007. Logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards models were used to test the association between weight change in the year before surgery and adverse pathology and BCR, respectively.

RESULTS:

In all, 152 (42%) men gained weight, 193 (54%) lost weight and 14 (4%) had the same weight. Among weight gainers, median gain was 2.4 kg and among weight losers, median loss was 2.7 kg. As a continuous variable, weight change was not associated with adverse pathology or BCR (all P>0.05). In secondary analysis, on multivariate analysis, men gaining ≥ 2.5 kg were at higher BCR risk (hazards ratio=1.65, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03-2.64, P=0.04) while weight loss ≥ 2.5 kg was not associated with BCR (hazards ratio=0.83, 95% CI: 0.54-1.29, P=0.41).

CONCLUSIONS:

As a continuous variable, weight change was not associated with outcome. In secondary hypothesis-generating analyses, weight gain ≥ 2.5 kg in the year before surgery, regardless of final body mass index, was associated with increased BCR following RP. If validated, these data suggest weight gain ≥ 2.5 kg may promote prostate cancer progression.

PMID:
21894174
DOI:
10.1038/pcan.2011.42
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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