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Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2011 Oct 12;366(1579):2806-14. doi: 10.1098/rstb.2011.0091.

Vaccines against malaria.

Author information

1
The Jenner Institute, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Oxford OX37DQ, UK. adrian.hill@ndm.ox.ac.uk

Abstract

There is no licenced vaccine against any human parasitic disease and Plasmodium falciparum malaria, a major cause of infectious mortality, presents a great challenge to vaccine developers. This has led to the assessment of a wide variety of approaches to malaria vaccine design and development, assisted by the availability of a safe challenge model for small-scale efficacy testing of vaccine candidates. Malaria vaccine development has been at the forefront of assessing many new vaccine technologies including novel adjuvants, vectored prime-boost regimes and the concept of community vaccination to block malaria transmission. Most current vaccine candidates target a single stage of the parasite's life cycle and vaccines against the early pre-erythrocytic stages have shown most success. A protein in adjuvant vaccine, working through antibodies against sporozoites, and viral vector vaccines targeting the intracellular liver-stage parasite with cellular immunity show partial efficacy in humans, and the anti-sporozoite vaccine is currently in phase III trials. However, a more effective malaria vaccine suitable for widespread cost-effective deployment is likely to require a multi-component vaccine targeting more than one life cycle stage. The most attractive near-term approach to develop such a product is to combine existing partially effective pre-erythrocytic vaccine candidates.

PMID:
21893544
PMCID:
PMC3146776
DOI:
10.1098/rstb.2011.0091
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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