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Neurologist. 2011 Sep;17(5):297-9. doi: 10.1097/NRL.0b013e31822d109c.

Risk of development of medication overuse headache with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy for migraine: a critically appraised topic.

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1
Department of Neurology and Library Services, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ 85255, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The development of medication overuse headache (MOH) is associated with frequent use of analgesics, especially opiates, for treatment of primary headache disorders, particularly migraine. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly used to treat migraine.

OBJECTIVE:

To critically evaluate evidence estimating the risk of MOH associated with NSAID therapy in patients with migraine.

METHODS:

The objective was addressed through the development of a structured, critically appraised topic. This included a clinical scenario, structured question, literature search strategy, critical appraisal, results, evidence summary, commentary, and bottom line conclusions. Participants included consultant and resident neurologists, a medical librarian, clinical epidemiologists, and headache neurology content experts.

RESULTS:

The 1-year incidence of MOH was 2.5%. In patients with low (0 to 4 d monthly) to moderate (5 to 9 d monthly) baseline headache frequency, NSAIDs were not associated with progression to MOH and may be protective (odds ratio=0.31; 95% confidence interval, 0.27-0.34). However, in patients with a high baseline headache frequency (10 to 14 d monthly), NSAIDs are associated with progression to MOH (odds ratio=1.93; 95% confidence interval, 1.82-2.06).

CONCLUSIONS:

Acute NSAID therapy is associated with progression to MOH in migraineurs with a high baseline migraine frequency but may be protective in patients with low baseline headache frequency. However, a causal role for NSAIDs in progression from episodic to chronic headache has not been established.

PMID:
21881477
DOI:
10.1097/NRL.0b013e31822d109c
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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