Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Sep;70(4):373-83. Epub 2011 Aug 29.

Traditional food and monetary access to market-food: correlates of food insecurity among Inuit preschoolers.

Author information

1
Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment and School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Macdonald Campus, McGill University, Ste. Anne-de-Bellevue, QC H9X 3V9, Canada. grace.egeland@mcgill.ca

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate correlates of food insecurity among Inuit preschoolers. Study design. Cross-sectional health survey.

METHODS:

Correlates of food insecurity were assessed in 3-5 year old children (n=388) residing in 16 Nunavut communities (2007-2008) in whom a high prevalence of child food insecurity (56%) has been documented. A bilingual team conducted interviews, including 24-hour dietary recalls and past-year food security assessment involving monetary access to market foods.

RESULTS:

Children residing in child food insecure homes were more likely to have consumed traditional food (TF) (51.7% vs. 39.9%, p ≤ 0.01), and less likely to have consumed any milk (52.2% vs. 73.2%, p ≤ 0.001) compared to children in child food secure homes. Median healthy eating index scores were significantly lower (77.1 vs. 79.9, p ≤ 0.01) and sugar drink intake higher (429 vs. 377 g/day, p ≤ 0.05) in children from child food insecure than food secure households. Children that consumed TF had higher protein and lower carbohydrate intake (p ≤ 0.05) and tendencies for a lower prevalence of iron deficiency (plasma ferritin <12 μg/l; p ≤ 0.10) regardless of food security status. A borderline significant interaction of TF by food security status (p ≤ 0.10) was observed where the percent of anemia (hemoglobin <110 and <115 g/l for 3-4 and 5 yr. olds, respectively) was highest among children from child food insecure homes who consumed no TF.

CONCLUSIONS:

TF and market food contribute to food security and both need to be considered in food security assessments. Support systems and dietary interventions for families with young children are needed.

PMID:
21878183
DOI:
10.3402/ijch.v70i4.17836
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Taylor & Francis
Loading ...
Support Center