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Gastroenterology. 2011 Dec;141(6):2210-2217.e2. doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2011.08.033. Epub 2011 Aug 27.

Intra-acinar trypsinogen activation mediates early stages of pancreatic injury but not inflammation in mice with acute pancreatitis.

Author information

1
Division of Basic and Translational Research, Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

The role of trypsinogen activation in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis (AP) has not been clearly established.

METHODS:

We generated and characterized mice lacking trypsinogen isoform 7 (T7) gene (T(-/-)). The effects of pathologic activation of trypsinogen were studied in these mice during induction of AP with cerulein. Acinar cell death, tissue damage, early intra-acinar activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), and local and systemic inflammation were compared between T(-/-) and wild-type mice with AP.

RESULTS:

Deletion of T7 reduced the total trypsinogen content by 60% but did not affect physiologic function. T(-/-) mice lacked pathologic activation of trypsinogen, which occurs within acinar cells during early stages of AP progression. Absence of trypsinogen activation in T(-/-) mice led to near complete inhibition of acinar cell death in vitro and a 50% reduction in acinar necrosis during AP progression. However, T(-/-) mice had similar degrees of local and systemic inflammation during AP progression and comparable levels of intra-acinar NF-κB activation, which was previously shown to occur concurrently with trypsinogen activation during early stages of pancreatitis.

CONCLUSIONS:

T7 is activated during pathogenesis of AP in mice. Intra-acinar trypsinogen activation leads to acinar death during early stages of pancreatitis, which accounts for 50% of the pancreatic damage in AP. However, progression of local and systemic inflammation in AP does not require trypsinogen activation. NF-κB is activated early in acinar cells, independently of trypsinogen activation, and might be responsible for progression of AP.

PMID:
21875495
PMCID:
PMC3587766
DOI:
10.1053/j.gastro.2011.08.033
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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