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Respir Med. 2012 Jan;106(1):120-6. doi: 10.1016/j.rmed.2011.06.015. Epub 2011 Aug 26.

Alpha-1 antitrypsin is elevated in exhaled breath condensate and serum in exacerbated COPD patients.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, Division for Pulmonary Diseases, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Hospital of the University of Marburg, Baldingerstrasse 1, 35043 Marburg, Germany. koczulla@med.uni-marburg.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) significantly contribute to COPD-related morbidity. Diagnosis of COPD exacerbations may be improved by analyzing biomarkers such as alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT). AAT is an acute-phase protein and inhibitor of neutrophil elastase. Deficiency of AAT may result in early-onset respiratory symptoms. Measurement of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) is a noninvasive method to investigate biomarkers present in the epithelial lining fluid, such as AAT.

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate whether AAT can be detected and quantified in EBC and to compare AAT levels in the EBC of healthy controls, patients with COPD, and during exacerbations of COPD.

METHODS:

EBC from 10 healthy controls, 17 subjects with COPD, and 18 subjects with exacerbations of COPD was collected with the RTube™ device. AAT from EBC and serum were quantified by ELISA.

RESULTS:

AAT in EBC was detectable in every individual. Patients with exacerbations of COPD had significantly increased AAT values (mean, 514.33 pg/mL, [SD 279.41 ]) compared with healthy controls (mean, 251.32 pg/mL, [SD 44.71]) and stable COPD patients (mean, 242.01 pg/mL [SD 65.74]) (P=0.0003; P=0.00003). EBC AAT showed only a correlation trend with serum AAT (r=0.3, P=0.054).

CONCLUSIONS:

AAT in EBC was detectable and quantifiable. AAT measured in EBC was significantly increased during exacerbations of COPD and can potentially be used as a biomarker in exacerbations.

PMID:
21872457
DOI:
10.1016/j.rmed.2011.06.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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