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Brain Inj. 2011;25(11):1126-38. doi: 10.3109/02699052.2011.607786. Epub 2011 Aug 26.

Associations between illness perceptions, coping styles and outcome after mild traumatic brain injury: preliminary results from a cohort study.

Author information

1
Rehabilitation Teaching and Research Unit, University of Otago, Wellington, New Zealand. deborah.snell@cdhb.govt.nz

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The objective of this study was to examine associations between injury perceptions, coping, distress and outcome after mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI).

DESIGN:

A prospective observational study with repeated measures. This study reports results from the first of two study visits.

PARTICIPANTS:

Participants (n = 147) were recruited within 3 months following presentation to a concussion clinic or an emergency department setting.

METHODS:

Clinical and demographic information was collected and participants completed a range of questionnaires (Revised Illness Perceptions Questionnaire, Brief COPE, Rivermead Post-Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire, Rivermead Follow-Up Questionnaire and HADS). Associations between independent variables and outcome were examined using odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals.

RESULTS:

Preliminary results suggested participants endorsing stronger beliefs about the injury identity (p < 0.05) and emotional impact (p < 0.01) had significantly greater odds of poor outcome at 3 months. There were also associations between higher educational attainment (p < 0.05), using active coping strategies (p < 0.06) and poor outcome.

CONCLUSIONS:

These variables appeared important determinants of outcome early after MTBI and may help identify those at risk for slow recovery. Current reassurance-based interventions may be improved by targeting such variables.

PMID:
21870903
DOI:
10.3109/02699052.2011.607786
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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