Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Affect Disord. 2012 Jan;136(1-2):155-162. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2011.07.014. Epub 2011 Aug 23.

A comparison of three screening tools to identify perinatal depression among low-income African American women.

Author information

1
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, United States. Electronic address: standon@jhmi.edu.
2
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, United States.
3
George Washington University, Department of Psychology, United States.
4
Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, United States.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The purpose of the current study was to determine the sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of three depression screening tools among a low-income African American population of pregnant and recently delivered women enrolled in home visitation programs in a low-income urban community.

METHODS:

Ninety-five women enrolled in home visitation programs-32 who were pregnant and 63 with a child <6 months comprise the study sample. Each woman completed a structured clinical interview and three depression screening tools-the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), and Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II).

RESULTS:

Over a quarter of women (28.4%) were experiencing major depression. Each screening tool was highly accurate in detecting major depression and major or minor depression among prenatal and postpartum women, with areas under the curve (AUCs) >0.90. Sensitivities of all screening tools were improved when using cutoffs lower than those considered standard by instrument developers.

LIMITATIONS:

Participants were recruited from home visitation programs in an urban context which may limit generalizability to other populations of low-income African American women. Given that no women during pregnancy met criteria for minor depression, it was not possible to determine optimal prenatal cutoff scores.

CONCLUSIONS:

Three depression screening tools-the EPDS, CES-D, and BDI-II-appear to be reliable and brief assessments of major and minor depression among low-income African American perinatal women. Providers using these tools should consider using lower cutoff scores to most effectively identify women in need of depression treatment.

PMID:
21864914
PMCID:
PMC3789596
DOI:
10.1016/j.jad.2011.07.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center