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Metabolism. 2011 Nov;60(11):1500-10. doi: 10.1016/j.metabol.2011.06.012. Epub 2011 Aug 23.

The effects of glucocorticoids on adipose tissue lipid metabolism.

Author information

1
School of Kinesiology and Health Science Muscle Health Research Centre, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. apeckett@yorku.ca

Abstract

Glucocorticoids (GCs) have long been accepted as being catabolic in nature, liberating energy substrates during times of stress to supply the increased metabolic demand of the body. The effects of GCs on adipose tissue metabolism are conflicting, however, because patients with elevated GCs present with central adiposity. We performed an extensive literature review of the effects of GCs on adipose tissue metabolism. The contradictory effects of GCs on lipid metabolism occur through a number of different mechanisms, some of which are well defined and others remain to be elucidated. Firstly, through increases in caloric and dietary fat intake, along with increased hydrolysis of circulating triglycerides (chylomicrons, very low-density lipoproteins) by lipoprotein lipase activity, GCs increase the amount of fatty acids in circulation, which are then available for ectopic fat distribution (liver, muscle, and central adipocytes). Glucocorticoids also increase de novo lipid production in hepatocytes through increased expression of fatty acid synthase. There is some controversy as to whether these same mechanisms occur in adipocytes, thereby contributing to adipose hypertrophy. Glucocorticoids promote preadipocyte conversion to mature adipocytes, causing hyperplasia of the adipose tissue. Glucocorticoids also have acute antilipolytic effect on adipocytes, whereas their genomic actions facilitate increased lipolysis after about 48 hours of exposure. The acute and long-term effects of GCs on adipose tissue lipolysis remain unclear. Although considerable evidence supports the notion that GCs increase lipolysis through glucocorticoid-induced increases of lipase expression, they clearly have antilipolytic effects within these same tissues and cell line models.

PMID:
21864867
DOI:
10.1016/j.metabol.2011.06.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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