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Pituitary. 2012 Sep;15(3):398-404. doi: 10.1007/s11102-011-0335-y.

Comparison of octreotide LAR and lanreotide autogel as post-operative medical treatment in acromegaly.

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1
Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Ministry of Health, Ankara Numune Research and Training Hospital, Ankara, Turkey. kardelendr@yahoo.com

Abstract

Long-acting somatostatin analogs are frequently used as adjuvant treatment of acromegaly patients after noncurative surgery. This sudy aims to compare the efficacy of octreotide long-acting release (OCT) and lanreotide Autogel (LAN) in acromegaly patients. Sixty-eight patients not cured by transsphenoidal endoscopic or microscopic pituitary surgery between 2003 and 2009 were retrospectively analyzed (25 men; 43 women; mean age 41.1 ± 10.9 years [range 18-65 years]). The patients were assigned randomly to OCT (n = 36) and LAN (n = 32) groups. Evaluations included insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and growth hormone (GH) after oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) 3, 6, 12 and 18 months after starting medical treatment; pituitary magnetic resonance imaging was performed before treatment and after 3 and 12 months. Patients achieving IGF-I levels within the age and gender normal range and GH level <1 μg/l following OGTT were considered a 'biochemical cure'. Mean IGF-I and GH values and tumor volumes (cm(3)) in the LAN and OCT groups were similar in the post-operative period before initiation of medical treatment. A statistically significant decrease in GH and IGF-I levels was obtained for both treatment groups at each follow-up visit compared to the previous value. Tumor shrinkage after 12 months of treatment was statistically significant in both groups but the percentage tumor shrinkage (28.5% vs. 34.9%, P = 0.166) and rate of patients achieving biochemical cure (63.9 and 78.1%, P = 0.454) were similar between OCT and LAN groups, respectively. OCT and LAN treatment options have similar efficacy for ensuring biochemical cure and tumor shrinkage in acromegaly patients who had noncurative surgery.

PMID:
21863263
PMCID:
PMC3443341
DOI:
10.1007/s11102-011-0335-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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