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Ger Med Sci. 2011;9:Doc20. doi: 10.3205/000143. Epub 2011 Aug 8.

Effects of CPAP-respiration on markers of glucose metabolism in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Author information

1
Sana Hospital Oldenburg, Diabetes Center, Oldenburg, Germany. l.hecht@sana-oh.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Syndrome (OSAS) is a condition of obstruction, apneas and arousals while sleeping. It has been suggested that OSAS independently influences glucose metabolism. The main treatment for OSAS is continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP).

OBJECTIVES:

To assess the effects of CPAP on insulin resistance and glucose metabolism.

SEARCH STRATEGY:

We searched Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Controlled Trial Register (January 2010).

SELECTION CRITERIA:

We included randomised and non-randomised trials comparing CPAP with inactive control or placebo CPAP in adults with OSAS.

DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS:

Two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Parallel and crossover group trials were analysed separately. A meta-analysis was carried out.

RESULTS:

Three parallel group and two cross-over randomised trials and one controlled trial were included investigating 296 participants. Sample sizes ranged from n=13 to n=102 participants, age was 18 to 75 years, mean body mass index (BMI) 27.2 kg/m² to 37.1 kg/m², mean apnoe hypopnoe index (AHI) 29.7 to 39.7 events per hour, mean dips >4% in arterial oxygen saturation per hour of sleep 1 to 42.7 events. The studies' methodological quality varied. Follow-up ranged from 4 to 12 weeks. Various endpoints were investigated. CPAP did neither influence plasma insulin levels nor HOMA-index, adiponectin levels or HbA1c value. One study reported a significant positive effect on the insulin sensitivity index (1.68%/min, 95% CI 0.3 to 3.06).

CONCLUSION:

This systematic review does not support the hypothesis that OSAS independently influences glucose metabolism. Sufficiently powered, long-term randomised controlled trials defining changes of insulin resistance as primary endpoint are needed.

KEYWORDS:

Insulin resistance; continuous positive airway pressure; diabetes mellitus type 2; meta-analysis; obstructive sleep apnea

PMID:
21863134
PMCID:
PMC3158650
DOI:
10.3205/000143
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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