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Biomark Med. 2011 Aug;5(4):439-49. doi: 10.2217/bmm.11.33.

Physiogenomic analysis of CYP450 drug metabolism correlates dyslipidemia with pharmacogenetic functional status in psychiatric patients.

Author information

1
Genomas Inc., Hartford, CT 06106, USA. gruano@harthosp.org

Abstract

AIMS:

To investigate associations between novel human cytochrome P450 (CYP450) combinatory (multigene) and substrate-specific drug metabolism indices, and elements of metabolic syndrome, such as low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLc), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLc), triglycerides and BMI, using physiogenomic analysis.

METHODS:

CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and CYP2D6 genotypes and clinical data were obtained for 150 consecutive, consenting hospital admissions with a diagnosis of major depressive disorder and who were treated with psychotropic medications. Data analysis compared clinical measures of LDLc, HDLc, triglyceride and BMI with novel combinatory and substrate-specific CYP450 drug metabolism indices.

RESULTS:

We found that a greater metabolic reserve index score is related to lower LDLc and higher HDLc, and that a greater metabolic alteration index score corresponds with higher LDLc and lower HLDc values. We also discovered that the sertraline drug-specific indices correlated with cholesterol and triglyceride values.

CONCLUSIONS:

Overall, we demonstrated how a multigene approach to CYP450 genotype analysis yields more accurate and significant results than single-gene analyses. Ranking the individual with respect to the population represents a potential tool for assessing risk of dyslipidemia in major depressive disorder patients who are being treated with psychotropics. In addition, the drug-specific indices appear useful for modeling a variable of potential relevance to an individual's risk of drug-related dyslipidemia.

PMID:
21861666
PMCID:
PMC3225002
DOI:
10.2217/bmm.11.33
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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