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J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2012 Mar;54(3):397-400. doi: 10.1097/MPG.0b013e318231cf17.

Crohn disease: effect on children's lifestyles.

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1
University of Otago, Wellington, New Zealand.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIM:

Crohn disease (CD) presents a range of physical, social, and psychological challenges, and can adversely affect the quality of life of those affected by it. The present study aimed to investigate the health-related quality of life of paediatric patients with CD in the Wellington region. Measuring health-related quality of life assists with resource allocation decisions and assesses various forms of interventions.

METHODS:

Patients ages 9 to 18 years with CD in the Wellington region were assessed using the IMPACT-III inflammatory bowel disease-specific questionnaire (n = 16). Eight participants filled it out and returned it by post; the remaining 8 filled it out in a meeting with the researcher and then underwent cognitive debriefing as part of a cross-cultural adaptation of the questionnaire.

RESULTS:

Of a maximum possible value of 175, the total health-related quality of life score had a mean value of 119.2 (standard deviation 30.7). Using Spearman rank correlation analysis, significant findings included a positive correlation between disease duration and quality of life (ρ = 0.534, sig. <0.05) and a negative correlation between disease activity and quality of life (ρ = -0.596, sig. <0.05). Qualitative information included difficulties in coping with long-term and unpleasant treatments and feelings of isolation.

CONCLUSIONS:

Children with Crohn disease in the Wellington region may benefit from age-specific social and psychological support. Because there is limited information on quality of life in young patients with CD in New Zealand, the results of the present study may be used as baseline data for future studies.

PMID:
21857249
DOI:
10.1097/MPG.0b013e318231cf17
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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