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J Urol. 2011 Oct;186(4 Suppl):1576-80. doi: 10.1016/j.juro.2011.03.098. Epub 2011 Aug 19.

Sacral nerve stimulator revision due to somatic growth.

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1
Children's Hospital Medical Center of Akron, Akron, Ohio, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Sacral nerve modulation is a Food and Drug Administration approved treatment for refractory urgency, frequency, urge incontinence and nonobstructive urinary retention in adults. The sparse literature on sacral nerve modulation in children focuses on its initial efficacy in patients with neurogenic bladder and dysfunctional elimination. We describe our initial experience with sacral nerve modulation and the phenomenon of growth spurts associated with lead malfunction that necessitates revision.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

After receiving institutional review board approval we retrospectively reviewed the charts of pediatric patients who underwent sacral nerve modulation surgery at our institution. Charts were examined for patient demographics, subjective success, the need for further surgery and success after revision.

RESULTS:

Four patients underwent sacral nerve modulation at an average age of 12.1 years. All patients reported initial success, defined as greater than 50% symptom improvement. Subsequently 3 patients required a total of 5 revisions due to lead malfunction with an average of 1.5 years between surgeries. In those requiring revision the average somatic growth between revisions was 8.1 cm. Return of efficacy was reported after each revision. All patients had functioning nerve stimulators in place and continued to have a positive subjective response.

CONCLUSIONS:

The sparse data on sacral nerve modulation in children shows efficacy and safety similar to those in adults. Somatic growth may be associated with lead malfunction and require surgical revision. We report a small series showing that revision can be done successfully and safely. Informed consent for sacral nerve modulation in pediatric patients should include a discussion of somatic growth as a possible cause of lead malfunction necessitating revision.

PMID:
21855923
DOI:
10.1016/j.juro.2011.03.098
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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